2000 Level Courses

ANTH 2020 6.0A: Race, Racism & Popular Culture

Course Directors: Fall term:   Dr. A. Chaudhuri, akc@yorku.ca                                                                                                                 Winter term:  Dr. L. Ameeriar, lalaie@yorku.ca 

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                    This course critically explores ideas of race and racist practice, both past and present. Through a range of readings and audio-visual materials, we will examine how race is produced and reproduced, as well as how racism is perpetuated and sustained, in multiple, shifting, and context-dependent ways. Of particular concern will be the ways in which various forms of popular culture are shaped by, and shape, race and racism.

The course will also look at how race and racisms intersect with, and in, the production of other identity categories and experiences, including gender, nation, class, ethnicity and sexuality. Overall, the course proceeds with the understanding that race is a social (often ideological) construction rather than a biological given. Attention will thus be given to histories of the idea of race and racist practice, and the social forces giving rise to these, both past and present.

The course will also try to illuminate some of the more subtle 'new racisms' characteristic of the contemporary period. A highlighting of Canadian context-specificities will be important in this regard, and throughout. We will also look at how (thinking about) conditions of globalization, diaspora and creolisation can complicate and help to enrich our understandings of race and the workings of racism in the contemporary period. Various strategies of resistance to racism will also be considered and debated in the process of exploring 'race from below'. A range of explanatory models and approaches will be examined from political economy and historical materialism, to discourse theory and performance theory.

Format: Two hour lecture plus one tutorial hour

ANTH 2020 6.0B: Race, Racism & Popular Culture - ONLINE

Course Director: Dr. A. Chaudhuri, akc@yorku.ca 

THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT FULLY ONLINE

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                       This course critically explores ideas of race and racist practice, both past and present. Through a range of readings and audio-visual materials, we will examine how race is produced and reproduced, as well as how racism is perpetuated and sustained, in multiple, shifting, and context-dependent ways. Of particular concern will be the ways in which various forms of popular culture are shaped by, and shape, race and racism.

The course will also look at how race and racisms intersect with, and in, the production of other identity categories and experiences, including gender, nation, class, ethnicity and sexuality. Overall, the course proceeds with the understanding that race is a social (often ideological) construction rather than a biological given. Attention will thus be given to histories of the idea of race and racist practice, and the social forces giving rise to these, both past and present.

The course will also try to illuminate some of the more subtle 'new racisms' characteristic of the contemporary period. A highlighting of Canadian context-specificities will be important in this regard, and throughout. We will also look at how (thinking about) conditions of globalization, diaspora and creolisation can complicate and help to enrich our understandings of race and the workings of racism in the contemporary period. Various strategies of resistance to racism will also be considered and debated in the process of exploring 'race from below'. A range of explanatory models and approaches will be examined from political economy and historical materialism, to discourse theory and performance theory.

ANTH 2100 6.0: Global Capitalism , Culture and Conflict

Course Director: Dr. A. Sorge, asorge@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                        This course analyzes and critiques the social and cultural foundations of historical and contemporary forms of global capitalism. The curriculum focuses on a critical examination of the social, political, and economic consequences of the production and circulation of global commodities, the rise of consumer capitalism, and the idea of the society of perpetual growth, as well as the resulting patterns of social change that continue to transform cultures worldwide. The rise of various forms of conflict that can accompany these global processes, such as terrorism, religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, racism, and nationalism, will complement our consideration of contemporary issues ranging from immigration, transnational labour mobility, and global flows of technology.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ANTH 2100 3.00 (prior to Fall 2013).

Format: Three hour lecture

ANTH 2110 6.0: Core Concepts in Anthropology

Course Director: Dr. Z. Hirji, zhirji@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                           Critically introduces the history and major traditions of the discipline of Anthropology including fieldwork methods and ethnographic writing. This course further introduces the distinctive contributions of anthropology and provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the core concepts required for upper level anthropology courses. Major national traditions of anthropology are distinguished, while their shared emphasis on fieldwork and ethnography is underscored. Lastly, this course will introduce the distinctive and lasting contributions of the discipline.

ANTH 2130 6.0: Anthropology Through the Visual: Images of Resistance/Irresistible Images

Course Director: Dr. L. Davidson, lmdavids@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                How are images a form of communication?  How do photographs, political cartoons, and visual art embody verbal interaction? In this course, students are introduced to a variety of visual forms of representation including, but not limited to films, advertisements, public art, cartoons, graphic novels, and social media, to understand how the visual conveys cultural lives and experiences.  We will start with the politics of representation and authority, particularly who is made visible, who is rendered invisible, and who is occluded in visual representations. We will address anthropology’s role in othering and objectifying various groups of people. Then, we will untangle the relationship between public memory, “truth”,  and “cancel culture”  and the conditions that contextualize the production and defacement of national monuments and memorials. We will unpack how and why toys, movies and other visual technologies produce, and are produced by, meaning, fantasy, and desire of and for various publics. In the later section of the course, we will cover how certain groups, such as Idle No More and Black Lives Matter, are creating political interventions through social media, gaining traction as political social movements and consider the implications of these counter-narratives.

This course uses film, video, visual art, photography and social media to explore key concepts in Anthropology such as race, ethnicity, nationality, globalization, power, authority, politics, religion, gender, class, sexuality and aesthetics. We view and analyze images produced by anthropologists and others, including commercial and documentary filmmakers, photographers and artists, the processes by which such images are produced and the contexts of their production. A central question the course asks is about the extent to which visual technologies that can now look deep into our bodies as well as far out into space are changing the understanding of what it means to be human in the 21st century.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ANTH 2120 6.0 Visualizing Ourselves, Visualizing Others

ANTH 2170 6.0: Sex, Gender and the Body: Cross-Cultural Approaches to the Body, Gender, Sexuality & Kinship

Course Director: Dr. A. Steinforth, asteinfo@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                 This course critically examines popular explanations of what is considered natural (and what is not) about sex, gender, the body and the family. Through a cross-cultural approach, biological models of natural gender roles, as well as sexual and familial relations, are explored and questioned.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ANTH 2170 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Format: Three hour lecture

ANTH 2210 6.0: Advocate and Engage for Change 

Course Director: Dr. K. Schmid, kschmid@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                               What should be the role of anthropology in the contemporary world? How can anthropology apply its methods and insights to local and global problems of inequality, injustice, and human suffering?
This course looks at the development of a publicly engaged anthropology that combines academic and applied anthropology in order to illuminate the larger social issues and problems of our times, encourage broad public conversations about them, and ultimately, affect social change.
We begin by tracing the ways that anthropologists have historically engaged with public issues and examine the implications of anthropology's critical rethinking of its theory and methods since the 1980s. We then examine key issues and case studies in Public Anthropology including: the impact of anthropological representations on the people they study; questions of cultural ownership and appropriation; debates around the repatriation of native artifacts and human remains held in museums; anthropologists' roles as advocates for indigenous peoples' political goals (such as land claims), and anthropologists' contributions to humanitarian and health crises (such as HIV/AIDS and TB).

CCE: ANTH 3210 6.0

ANTH 2300 3.0: Intercultural Training Skills

Course Director: Dr. K. Schmid, kschmid@yorku.ca

(Restricted enrollment: for iBA students only)

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                    This course prepares students to negotiate their learning goals in a cross-cultural context while on university exchange. Topics covered may include culture, participant observation, culture shock, risk & safety, managing intercultural conflict, friendship, travel, politeness, cleanliness, gender & sexuality, gifts, poverty, religion and health.

ANTH 2330 6.0: Outbreak! Contagion and Risk in Anthropological Context

Course Director: Dr. F. Best-Jackson, fjbest@yorku.ca

Course Description                                                                                                                                                                                     We are living in a global pandemic. This moment has made the study of infectious disease, viruses, vaccines, and contagion more urgent as we grapple with COVID19 and the ways it has changed our lives. While many of our lives have been affected by COVID19 and subsequent restrictions such as physical distancing and mandatory masking, how each of us is impacted by the virus is not uniform. The same can be said about many viruses and infectious disease that humans have encountered before.

How we experience infectious diseases and viruses is informed by a host of factors which include race, geographical location, class/socio-economic status, sexuality, gender, privilege, etc. Additionally, how we understand and negotiate things like risk, public good, community well-being, and self-care as they relate to health and illness are also affected by who we are and where we come from. Simply said, no disease will impact two people in the exact same ways.

This course explores the social aspect of illness, viruses, and disease using local and global examples. The course will begin with an introduction to medical anthropology and concepts that are at its foundation which include biomedicine as cultural phenomenon, risk, and cross-cultural explorations of illness and health. We will engage with readings that explore diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, SARS, and COVID19 to illustrate the importance of understanding infectious diseases and viruses beyond biological pathogens. In the second term we will explore common approaches to interventions created for infectious diseases, and look at the contributions of anthropologists to improving human and environmental health.

In this course, you will be introduced to:

  1. The field of medical anthropology,
  2. The importance of ethnographic research for the study of health and disease,
  3. The relationship between culture, class/SES, gender, race, sexuality, politics, inequality, and disease phenomena, with specific attention to infectious diseases in local, national, and/or international contexts,
  4. Critical learning skills, including basic anthropological research methods, theories, academic integrity and applications of knowledge